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1AASAustralian Accounting Standards Various definitions found in this Glossary refer to the definition’s Source: AAS

2AccessSAMIS is accessed by a wide range of people who use the system in many ways. The level of access allocated to your user profile will determine what types of information you can see or update.

3AcquisitionAcquisition is one of the Cost Categories within the port]e[co system. It refers to the activities associated with establishing new or adding to existing assets. See also: Acquisition Date Cost Categories

4Acquisition DateThe Acquisition Date is the date of settlement on which the Asset was purchased or acquired by the Facility.

5Actual Life Cycle CostsThe total cost of what was actually spent on an asset throughout its life, including the costs of planning, design, acquisition, operations, maintenance, and disposal, less any residual value; or the total cost of providing, owning, and maintaining a building or component over a predetermined evaluation period. The life cycle cost categories in SAMIS include, investigation, sustainment, improvement replacement, acquisition, disposal. See also: Life Cycle Costs Forecast Life Cycle Costs

6Actual Performance SAMIS Users undertake Performance Assessments and the result is an Actual score or status of how the asset performed. This is assessed and recorded in relation to targets. Assessment is usually set against a series of performance criteria or measures. See also: Performance Assessment

7Add AssetAdd Asset is a link found in the toolbox of port]e[co. It is also included as an option within the Asset Register. If you have access, this Add Asset link will allow you to add an Asset to the Facility displayed on the page. See also: Asset

8Add DepartmentRefer to: Add Functional Group

9Add FacilityIf you have access, this link in port]e[co will allow you to add a new Facility and its related details within the Asset Register Page. See also: Facility

10Add Functional GroupAdd Functional Group (formerly Add Department) is a link found in the toolbox of port]e[co. If you have access, the Functional Group (Department) link will allow you to add a Functional Group (Department) to the Facility displayed on the page See also: Functional Group (previously Department) Functional Group Usage (previously Department Usage) Functional Group Maintain (previously Department Maintain)

11AdditionsRefer to: Improvements & Additions

12Administration or AdminCertain functions within port]e[co are restricted to specialist users. These users are referred to as Administrators, and perform such functions as code table maintenance, adding or modifying users, etc.

13AgencyAll Departments, service agencies and statutory authorities in the South Australian Government (Source : DAIS)

14Agency Rating ScaleFor each performance measure, levels of performance with associated descriptive attributes need to be identified against which performance can be assessed. A Business Entity will use one type only. Hierarchical (1-5) OR Relative (-2, -1, 0, +1, +2)

15Aggregation RulesThe rules by which performance assessments of individual assets or departments can be aggregated or collected at a higher level e.g. aggregation of assessments of various rooms to form an assessment of a series of rooms or building.

16Alternate Asset IDAn Alternate Asset ID allows an alternative number to be entered to help identify an Asset. It may be a number that is used to identify the Asset in another system. See also: Asset

17Alternate Facility IDAn Alternate Facility ID allows an alternative number to be entered to help identify a Facility. It may be a number that is used to identify the Facility in another system. See also: Facility

18APCCAustralian Procurement and Construction Council Inc. A council of departments responsible for procurement, construction and asset management policy for the Australian, State and Territory governments and the New Zealand Government.

19ArchiveThe removal of information/data from the general SAMIS environment for storage within another less accessible part of the system. This is generally done to older information not needed on a regular basis, which may be needed for historical, compliance, or other purposes.

20AssetAn asset is a physical entity that has value, enables services to be provided and has an expected economic life of 12 months or more.Assets may be natural resources, building structures, land, plant and equipment, heritage and cultural assets or any other form of infrastructure excluding networks. Financial information, human resources and intellectual property are not included. See also: Add Asset Alternate Asset ID Asset Class Asset Class Attributes Asset Class Category Asset Classification System Asset Details Asset Disposal Asset Functions Asset Hierarchy Asset ID Asset Location Asset Ownership Asset Register Asset Status Asset Summary Asset Types Asset View Asset's Child Asset's Parent

21Asset ClassComprises a group of assets i.e., physical entities, that share one or more common attribute. Examples of Asset Classes include Sites, Buildings, Grounds, Plant and Equipment, Mobile Assets, Collections. See also: Asset

22Asset Class AttributesEach asset class can have a unique set of 'features' or attributes. For example, assets of class 'air conditioner' may have attributes such as make, model or serial number. These attributes may not be relevant to other asset classes (such as building, for example). Asset Class attributes allow a user to record data about an asset, based on the asset class that asset is currently in. See also: Asset

23Asset Class CategoryA physical facility or product of value enabling services to be provided is grouped into a collection of things sharing a common attribute. The Category is the most extensive way into which things can be distributed. Defines / assembles / groups the asset class into a collection of things sharing a common attribute By which can arrange them in a system, the most extensive way into which things can be distributed Defines the state or condition of assets in the same category. See also: Asset

24Asset Classification SystemThe Asset Classification System structures asset classes in an ordered way, which is capable of forming a classification hierarchy with parent / child relationships eg, Site is a parent of Building. See also: Asset Classification Hierarchy

25Asset DemandA definition or measure of the current and future demand for an asset or assets, or for the service potential of that asset or assets. (Source: DAIS)

26Asset DetailsThese are the general details listed in the first page in the Add Asset series. Asset Details include Asset ID, Name, Local Name, Description, Class, Type, Status, Acquisition Date, Commissioning Date, Number of items & Notes. See also: Asset

27Asset Disposal or RationalisationAsset Disposal or Rationalisation considerations are triggered where building assets are identified as under performing, under-utilised, poorly located or inadequately supporting Agency business service functions. See also: Disposal Options

28Asset FunctionsThe particular use or function that the asset is intended to support. See also: Asset

29Asset HierarchyThe Asset Hierarchy defines the relationship between Assets and the part they play in overall service delivery. See also: Asset

30Asset IDThe Asset ID is a system-generated number to identify the asset within the SAMIS system. It is not editable within Samis, but it is searchable. See also: Asset

31Asset LifecycleRefer to: Lifecycle Lifecycle Costs

32Asset LocationAsset Location is the second page in the Add / Edit Asset series. The location of an Asset positions it within the Asset Hierarchy. Most Assets do not need to be located. The Asset's location is fixed by the Asset Classification Hierarchy. Some Asset classes can however have different 'parents' depending on an agency's needs. For example, an air conditioner can have Asset location classes of 'site', 'building' or 'room', meaning that when an air conditioner is added/edited in the Asset Register, the user may select a 'site', 'building' or 'room', to be its parent. See also: Asset Locatable

33Asset ManagementA systematic approach to the procurement, maintenance, operation, rehabilitation and disposal of one or more assets, which integrates the utilisation of assets and their performance with the business requirements of asset owners or users. (Source: NCRB)

34Asset Management Information SystemAsset Management Information System A system for collecting and analysing data on the performance of existing assets, including their operational costs. As an example the Strategic Asset Management Information System SAMIS is used in the South Australian context . (Source: DAIS) See also: SAMIS

35Asset OwnershipAssets can have ownership in 2 different ways. Assets can get inferred ownership via facility relationships. Asset ownership is assumed for any facility with an ultimate responsibility relationship to the site. Alternatively, a specific asset ownership can be defined via business relationships. Business relationships are defined for business entities that are Non Government Business Entities. For example, the State Superannuation Trust owns buildings used by Government Agencies. See also: Asset

36Asset PerformanceA quantified measure of the contribution an asset makes towards stated objectives or agreed standards. (Source: DAIS)

37Asset Register The Asset Register constitutes the heart of port]e[co. It is where all information that describes and classifies Government Facilities and their Assets is stored. The data source records information on individual assets, including assets' location, condition, function and ownership details, as well as the value and depreciation of the asset and its major components. (Source: SSA) The Asset Register in SAMIS is structured in the form of a hierarchy that indicates a logical child parent relationship between assets eg, Site is a parent of Building. A Floor/Level (Parent) is made up of a group of Rooms (Child.) A Room (Parent) is made up of Walls (Child), Doors (Child), Window (Child) etc See also: Asset

38Asset StatusThe status reflects how the asset is being used. Examples of Asset Status include: Prior to commissioning, In service, Inactive, Awaiting Disposal, Disposed, Surplus (in Use), Surplus (not in use.) See also: Asset

39Asset SummaryThis is the final page in the Add Asset series. It provides the user with a summary of all information entered on earlier pages in the stream. This allows the user to confirm all details before committing them to the database. See also: Asset

40Asset TypesAsset Types allow a user to further categorise an asset class. Asset Type can then be used as a measure in life cycle costing. Examples of Asset types for an asset class of 'roof' which could be gabled, domed, flat etc. See also: Asset

41Asset UtilisationA measure of how effectively an asset is being used to meet an agency’s service delivery objectives. (Source: UN)

42Asset ValuationRefer to: Current Cost Current Market Value Current Replacement Cost Current Value Insurance (Reinstatement) Value Net Market Value Residual Value

43Asset ViewAsset View is a port]e[co page that allows you to view the Asset Details of a selected Asset. This is a READ ONLY page. See also: Asset Asset Details. General Details

44Asset's ChildRefer to: Parent & Child Assets See also Asset

45Asset's ParentRefer to: Parent & Child Assets See also: Asset

46AttributesRefer to: Asset Class Attributes

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47BCThe Burra Charter, Australia ICOMOS Inc. assisted by the Australian Heritage Commission. Various definitions found in this Glossary refer to the definition’s Source: BC

48BenefitA Benefit refers to a gain in consumer satisfaction or welfare from a project or program. (Source: SATF) See also: Benefit / Cost Analysis

49Benefit / Cost AnalysisA technique for the evaluation of projects where all the benefits and costs, both direct and indirect, are considered. Where possible all benefits and costs should be quantified in financial terms. Where this is not possible the benefits and costs should be quantified in non-financial terms or described so as to identify the impact of the benefit or cost. (Source: SATF) See also: Benefit

50Business CaseA Business Case is used to justify resource allocation against projects or initiatives that seek to streamline or improve divisional operations.

51Business Context StatementThe purpose of asset resources is to support the delivery of an organisation's business service outcomes. The Business Context Statement articulates an organisation's business service imperatives and associated service delivery strategy, which is the necessary starting point for the development of asset performance measures. See also: Business Case Business Driver/s Business Entity / Entities Business Framework Business Service Imperatives Business Service/s Business Relationships

52Business Driver/sA Business Driver one of a number of business imperatives necessary for the successful delivery of the business or business service delivery strategy. See also: Business Context Statement Business Case Business Entity / Entities Business Service Imperatives Business Service/s Business Relationships

53Business Entity / EntitiesBusiness Entities are generally South Australian Government (SAG) departments (eg. DECD, DH, DPTI) that have a relationship to SAG facilities and therefore assets. They may also be non-government organisations that in some way have a relationship with assets the government utilises eg. Lessors or building owners. See also: Business Context Statement Business Driver/s Business Framework Business Service Imperatives Business Service/s Business Relationships

54Business RelationshipsThe Business Relationships page is the fourth page in the Add/Edit Asset series of pages. Business Relationships exist between Assets and associated Business Entities.There is a wide choice of relationships that the Business Entity can have with the Asset. The options are: Asset Ownership - the Business Entity owns the Asset Facility Manager - the Business Entity manages the Facility that the Asset belongs to Occupant - the Business Entity occupies the Asset Lessor - the Business Entity is the lessor of the Asset or Lessee - the Business Entity is the lessee of the Asset There may be more than one Business Relationship that you would like to add which relates to the particular Asset. If Asset Ownership or Occupant relationships are not specified, it is assumed that the Business Entity that is ultimately responsible for the Facility (that the Asset belongs to) owns and occupies the Asset. This 'ultimate responsibility' relationship between a Facility and Business Entity is defined within Facility Relationships. See also: Business Context Statement Business Case Business Driver/s Business Entity / Entities Business Framework Business Service Imperatives Business Service/s Occupant

55Business Service Delivery StrategyA plan of action for the supply of services by an organisation to its clients, which is consistent with that organisation’s corporate goals. Knowledge of an organisation’s business service delivery strategy enables identification of performance requirements and hence Performance Measures for the asset that best supports business objectives. See also: Business Case Business Service/s Business Service Imperatives

56Business Service ImperativesServices that must be performed within a facility. For example, Flinders Medical Centre must provide an emergency function. Norwood-Morialta High School must provide a science teaching function. See also: Business Context Statement Business Case Business Driver/s Business Entity / Entities Business Framework Business Service/s Business Relationships Business Service Delivery Strategy

57Business Service/sAn organisation's business service objectives and associated service delivery strategy are stated in the Business Context Statement. Business Services define specific functions performed by the business to meet the needs of its customers. See also: Business Context Statement Business Case Business Driver/s Business Entity / Entities Business Framework Business Service Imperatives Business Relationships Business Service Delivery Strategy

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58CACommonwealth Publications Various definitions found in this Glossary refer to the definition’s Source: CA

59CapitalThe amount of cost or revenue that is from a Department’s Capital budget. See also: Recurrent Capital Cost Capital Investment Capital Works

60Capital CostThe cost associated with the development of a project, including site acquisition, design, construction, interim financing, and project management. (Source: NCRB) The cost incurred by the agency in procuring additional or upgraded assets. (Source: SATF) See also: Capital Capital Investment Capital Works

61Capital InvestmentCapital Investment describes the acquisition of a new building asset, or the material improvement of an existing building that produces an increase in service capacity, quality or an extension of its useful life. See also: Capital Capital Cost Capital Works

62Capital WorksA term that relates to the procurement of physical assets through the expenditure of capital funds. (Source: DAIS)

63CentroidThe Centroid is a geographic term that refers to the centre of the shape defined by the boundary of a site. The boundary is obtained from the definition of the legal land parcels that make up a site. Examples of a Centroid are latitudes and longitudes. port]e[co uses 'eastings' and 'northings' which are measurements, in metres, North and East of a specific point. See also: Northing Easting

64Child AssetA Child Asset refers to a sub-item that is positioned with a relationship to another Asset to which it belongs, namely a Parent Asset. This structure is arranged in descending order of superior size or to characterise the situation where an asset belongs, or is positioned within a “Parent Asset”. See also: Asset Asset’s Child Parent & Child Assets

65Class CategoryRefer to: Asset Class Category

66Classification HierarchyThe Asset Hierarchy defines the relationship between Assets and the part they play in overall service delivery. It also defines what type of assets a particular asset can have, as it’s ‘parent’ & ‘children’. It structures asset classes in an ordered way, which is capable of forming a classification hierarchy with parent / child relationships eg, Site is a parent of Building. The Classification Hierarchy View page will be seen only by System Administrators with special access to port]e[co. Also see: Asset Classification System

67cogn]i[tocogn]i[to allows users to create and manage their own SAMIS reports. In addition cogn]i[to provides a series of standard reports by retrieving information from port]e[co. cogn]i[to is based on a data analysis tool that is already used within government in other systems.

68Commissioning DateCommissioning Date refers to the date that the Asset was commissioned into service - i.e. the date it was first available to use. For a building this could be the date of practical completion or the 'opening date'.

69ConsequenceThe outcome of an event or situation expressed qualitatively or quantitatively, being a loss, injury, disadvantage or gain. (Source: DAIS - AS4360)

70CostThe direct and indirect impact (specifically negative impact) of an activity, including money, time, labour, disruption, goodwill, political and intangible items. (Source: DAIS) See also: Capital Cost Current Cost Current Replacement Cost Current Reproduction Cost Life Cycle Cost Recurrent Cost Whole of Life Costs

71Cost CategoriesWithin the SAMIS environment, Cost Categories are structured to reflect the life cycle functions of an asset and are categorised as follows (the categories also correspond with a continuum that ranges from recurrent to capital expenditure): Investigation - activities necessary to prepare a feasibility or business case Sustainment - activities necessary to ensure asset performance at the intended design level of performance Improvement - activities that improve the performance of the asset compared with its design level Replacement - activities necessary to maintain design performance by replacement of core components Acquisition - activities associated with establishing new or adding to existing assets Disposal - activities associated with preparation for sale or removal of assets that no longer support service delivery.

72Criticality RatingsCriticality Ratings refer to an ordering scale which presents assets in an order of priority to fix / address any problems / inadequacies which showed up in an assessment.

73Criticality WeightingsCriticality weightings provide the ability to assign weightings eg, Low, Medium, High, to reflect the relative importance between performance measures. For example, an agency may decide that 'condition' is not as important as 'suitability'. They can put a criticality weighting of 'low' on condition and 'high' on suitability. An asset planner can then use this weighting when deciding on which gaps and risks to assess first. Criticality Weightings are usually assigned when the measure is created, before the assessment is made, and indicates the asset planner’s priorities within measures.

74Current CostThe cost of an asset measured by reference to the lowest cost at which the gross future economic benefits embodied in the asset could currently be obtained in the normal course of business. (source: SATF) See also Cost Current Market Value Current Replacement Cost Current Reproduction Cost

75Current Market ValueThe amount for which an asset could be exchanged, or a liability settled, between knowledgeable, willing parties in an arm’s length transaction. (Source: SATF) See also Cost Current Cost Current Replacement Cost Current Reproduction Cost

76Current Replacement CostThe current cost of reproducing (replicating) the asset in terms of both scale and technology. (Source: NCRB) See also Cost Current Cost Current Market Value Current Reproduction Cost

77Current Reproduction CostThe financial cost to fully replace an asset with the same asset (to reproduce what is there now, like for like). This generally applies in the context of heritage type assets and therefore in circumstances where the asset is not normally available. The current cost of reproducing (replicating) the asset in terms of both scale and technology. It applies where the asset being valued would be replaced with a similar asset representing significantly unchanged technology. See also Cost Current Cost Current Market Value Current Replacement Cost

78Current ValueThe value of an asset at the present time. It may be estimated from the current market value or where the market is deficient, by other methods such as depreciated value using current cost accounting. (Source: NCRB) See also Current Market Value

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79Deferral ConsequencesPredictions can be made about the consequences of deferring an intervention action to attend to a deficiency identified during the performance assessment process. This helps with the prioritisation of works. Residual risk includes deferral consequences and likelihood.

80Delete FacilityDelete Facility refers to a function available via a link in the Toolbox of port]e[co. If you have access, this link will allow you to delete the Facility displayed on the page. See also: Facility

81Demand ProfileThe level and nature of public/community demand for services to be provided from a particular site/facility/asset. This may include the area from which clients come, their age group, socio economic status etc. See also: Demographic Demand Profile

82Demographic Demand ProfileThe demographic profile represents the demand characteristics of a particular demographic area, age group, socio economic status etc. See also: Demand Profile

83DepartmentThe term Department is referred to in the SAMIS system as Functional Groups. Refer to: Functional Groups

84Department UsageRefer to: Functional Group Usage

85Departments MaintainRefer to: Functional Groups Maintain

86DepreciationDepreciation is a systematic charge, which recognises the consumption of assets over their useful lives. The depreciation charge calculated in a reporting period should represent the amount of the consumption of economic benefits in that period. The useful life of an asset is a matter of fact which needs to be determined for each asset. Factors affecting the useful life include wear and tear, technical obsolescence and commercial obsolescence.The three most common methods used for calculating depreciation expense are: - Straight line method - Reducing balance method - Output method. The method chosen should be that which most accurately reflects the pattern of consumption of the asset over its useful life. (Source: SA Treasury & Finance Accounting Policy Statement No 7) See also: Depreciation - Straight-line Method Depreciation - Reducing balance method Depreciation - Output method

87Depreciation - Output methodThe overall output or service that an asset is expected to yield may be the basis for estimating the useful life of the asset. Examples of output or service include production units, operating hours and distance travelled. This basis of estimating useful life and determining depreciation expense is appropriate where the service potential of an asset is extinguished in direct proportion to its utilisation and before the asset becomes technologically or commercially obsolete. For example, a photocopier may have a useful life of one million copies. The depreciation charge for the copier will then be based on copies produced during the reporting period. If 150 000 copies are produced in a reporting period, 15% of the depreciable amount of the copier can be allocated to that period. (Source: SA Treasury & Finance Accounting Policy Statement No 7) See also: Depreciation Depreciation - Reducing balance method Depreciation - Straight-line Method

88Depreciation - Reducing Balance MethodThe Reducing Balance Method is used where the service yield of an asset is expected to be higher in earlier reporting periods than in subsequent periods. The earlier periods bear a greater portion of the cost of consumption than later periods.The annual depreciation charge is calculated by applying the depreciation rate to the written down amount (cost or other revalued amount less accumulated depreciation) of the asset current at the beginning of the reporting period (unless the asset has been revalued upwards). (Source: SA Treasury & Finance Accounting Policy Statement No 7) See also: Depreciation Depreciation - Straight-line Method Depreciation - Output method

89Depreciation - Straightline MethodThe straight-line method allocates the cost of consumption of an asset equally per period over its useful life. The annual depreciation charge is calculated by dividing the depreciable amount of the asset by its useful life. The depreciable amount of an asset consists of its historic cost or other revalued amount less the estimated net amount recoverable on its disposal at the end of its useful life. (Source: SA Treasury & Finance Accounting Policy Statement No 7) See also: Depreciation Depreciation - Reducing balance method Depreciation - Output method

90Depreciation MethodsDepreciation Methods are available to reflect the pattern of consumption or deterioration of an asset. Accounting Policy recommends that the Method of Depreciation should be that which most accurately reflects the pattern of consumption of the asset over its estimated life. Those Methods of Depreciation most commonly used to calculate depreciation expense include straight line, reducing balance and the output basis. For asset managers, a condition-based approach to depreciation is regarded as a more realistic way of reflecting an asset's consumption, but the accounting community does not generally accept this. See also: Depreciation Depreciation - Straightline Method Depreciation - Accelerated Method Depreciation - Double Declining Balance Method Depreciation - Declining Balance Method

91DisposalDisposal is one of the Cost Categories within the port]e[co system. It refers to a process whereby an asset is decommissioned, disposed of, or sold. (Source: DAIS) See also : Cost Categories Disposal Options

92Disposal OptionsThe different options considered once it has been decided that an asset no longer supports its intended business service delivery outcomes and has therefore reached the end of its useful life. Eg, options include possible re use, including relocation, sale or demolition. See also: Disposal

93Documents / Imagesport]e[co has functionality to allow a user to store documents and images as additional information (usually held in other systems). These can be stored against particular Facilities, Sites or Assets. These files may be in held in a variety of formats (eg .doc, .jpg, .dwg etc) port]e[co supports minimal image storage. These should be stored in external systems.

94DPTIDepartment of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure

95Drop Down ListsA Drop Down List refers to a list of values that exist for a particular field within the system and restricts your options. The list is accessible by clicking on the down arrow to the right of the field, or by typing the first character. Once your option is highlighted on the list, click again and the field will be populated. You can also cycle through options with the same first character by continuing to press it. For example, A month pick list will cycle through January, June & July if the 'J' button is repeatedly pressed.

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96EastingAn Easting is the Y coordinate for a Centroid See also: Centroid Northing

97Economic LifeThe period of time for which net benefits are maximized. An asset reaches the end of its physical life when it is unable to perform the functions for which it was originally required – in effect the asset “wears out”. The economic life of an asse3t is usually shorter than its physical life. (Source: SATF)

98Edit AssetWhen you are in the Facility Details page, you can Edit an Asset via a link in the port]e[co Toolbox called Departments. If you have access, this link will allow you to modify the Assets associated with the Facility displayed. See also: Asset

99Edit DepartmentRefer to: Edit Functional Group

100Edit FacilityWhen you are in the Facility Details page, you can Edit a Facility via a link in the port]e[co Toolbox. If you have access, you can modify the Facility details displayed on the page. See also: Facility

101Edit Functional GroupWhen you are in the Facility Details page, you can Edit a Functional Group (formerly known as a Department) via a link in the port]e[co Toolbox called Functional Groups (Departments). If you have access, you can modify the details regarding the functional group associated with the Facility displayed. See also: Functional Group (Department)

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102Facilities AuditAn audit of the physical and functional adequacy of a Facility, with particular reference to the building fabric and building service components, to provide an input for life cycle cost analysis, short term maintenance planning and long term planning purposes. (Source: NCRB)

103Facilities ManagementFacilities Management is the process of planning, managing, maintaining, rationalising and accounting for facilities and associated overall costs. The primary focus of facilities management is to provide the optimum of facility for the least financial outlay. (Source: NRCB)

104FacilityA Facility is an entity that provides one Primary Business Service for a Business Entity. This may be made up of one or many sites and/or assets. Examples of Facilities are the Royal Adelaide Hospital, Norwood-Morialta High School and Flinders Medical Centre. See also: Add Facility Alternate Facility ID Delete Facility

105Facility DetailsFacility Details is an information system page that provides general details about a Facility. Information displayed includes the facility name and address, an optional alternative facility number and the primary business service provided by the facility for a displayed Business Entity. This page has links that allow the user to edit facility related items, such as the general details mentioned above, the facility business context statement, facility assessments; departments related to the facility or facility measure profiles. See also: Facility

106Facility IDA system generated number unique to each facility. This number can be used for searching purposes. See also: Facility

107Facility Maintain PageThis port]e[co page allows a user to add a new Facility with its related details or make changes to an already existing Facility. See also: Facility

108Facility ManagerThe person responsible for planning, managing, maintaining, rationalising and accounting for facilities and associated services while simultaneously seeking to reduce the associated overall costs. The primary focus of facilities management is to provide the optimum level of facility for the least financial outlay. (Source: NCRB) See also: Facility Facilities Management

109Facility NameThe common name for a Facility. See also: Facility

110Facility Performance AssessmentFacility Performance Assessment is a prerequisite to establishing the performance status of an Agency's building stock. Assessment occurs against a range of performance measures in the context of the Agency's business service delivery strategy. It helps determine if assets are in the right place, being properly utilised, meeting suitability requirements, along with the state of their physical condition and operating efficiency. See also: Facility

111Facility RelationshipsFacility Relationships defines the relationship between an Asset and a Facility. Every Asset with an Asset Class of 'Site' must have an ultimate responsibility relationship with a Facility, or a Business Relationship defined by the owner. This 'ultimate responsibility' relationship between a Facility and an asset is defined within Facility Relationships. Alternatively, a Facility may have a usage relationship with an asset. This relationship type is used for example where a DHS Dental Clinic 'uses' a building on a school site. See also: Facility

112Facility TypeA Facility Type describes the various types of facilities that exist, for example: high school, junior primary school, and country hospital. A Facility Type provides one Primary Business Service for a Business Entity. See also: Facility

113Facility ViewThis is a page where you can view both the location and details about the selected Facility. Sites can then be provided on the page. See also: Facility

114Fair ValueThe amount for which an asset could be exchanged, or liability settled, between knowledgeable, willing parties in an arm's length transaction. In situations where there is no market evidence of the asset's market selling price, because the asset is specialised, the asset's fair value is measured at its market buying price, the best indicator of which is the replacement cost of the asset's remaining future economic benefits. Reference AAS 38.

115Forecast Life Cycle CostsThe total cost of an asset throughout its life, including the costs of planning, design, acquisition, operations, maintenance, and disposal, less any residual value (Source: NCRB) or the total cost of providing, owning, and maintaining a building or component over a predetermined evaluation period. The life cycle cost categories in SAMIS include, investigation, sustainment, improvement replacement, acquisition, disposal. See also: Actual Life Cycle Costs Life Cycle Costs

116Fully Enclosed Covered AreaThe sum of all such areas at all building floor levels, including basements (except unexcavated portions), floored roof spaces and attics, garages, penthouses, enclosed porches and attached enclosed covered ways alongside buildings, equipment rooms, lift shafts, vertical ducts, staircases and any other fully enclosed spaces and usable areas of the building, computed by measuring from the normal INSIDE face of exterior walls but ignoring any projections such as plinths, columns, piers and the like which project from the normal inside face of exterior walls. It shall not include open courts, light wells, connecting or isolated covered ways and net open areas of upper portions of rooms, lobbies, halls, interstitial spaces and the like which extend through the storey being computed.

117Functional Group A Functional Group (formerly known as Department) is a distinct, usually specialised division of a large organisation, with varying needs to deliver in a particular service or responsibility. Functional Groups can only be added to a facility, not an Asset. Each Department use an Asset in various ways, which is recorded as a percentage to define their usage. Please note - DECS equivalent term for a Functional Groups or Departments is referred to as 'Faculties' or 'Sub Organisational Units' See also: Add Department Department Usage Department Maintain

118Functional Group UsageA Facility can be sub categorised by Functional Groups (formerly Departments). Functional Group Usage refers to the process of allocating how much each asset is used by a department. Functional Group Usage, if specified, must add up to 100%. For example, Two Functional Groups may use a particular room. Functional Group Usage allows the asset manager to allocate the usage of the asset 50/50, or 70/30. Most assets are used 100% by one Functional Group . See also: Add Functional Group (Add Department) Functional Group (Department) Functional Group Maintain (Department Maintain)

119Functional Groups MaintainFunctional Groups Maintain (formerly Departments Maintain) refers to a page in port]e[co in which you can view a Functional Group's Business Context Statement. You can also view and maintain a Functional Group's Performance Measure Hierarchy. This page displays a list of Functional Groups associated with the selected Facility. You can 'Add' a new Functional Group or delete a Functional Group from this Facility. See also: Add Functional Group (Add Department) Functional Group (Department) Functional Group Usage (Department Usage)

120Funding SourceThe budgeting source of an agency, where allocation is made for the maintenance, enhancement, intervention option or acquisition of an asset.

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121GapThe Gap is the difference between the Target Value established for a Performance Measure and the Actual Value determined at the time the Facility / Asset is assessed. See also: Gap Analysis

122Gap AnalysisThe gaps associated with various measures are assessed both individually and holistically, and may reveal 'hot spots' that require more detailed information and examination. A structured risk analysis may be undertaken based on AS/NZS 4360 - 1999: 'Risk Management'. This includes analysis of the likelihood and consequences of each gap to determine the level of risk. Using weightings assigned earlier in the process, the deficiencies inherent in various gaps may be prioritised and ranked. See also: Gap

123GCRCGross Current Replacement Cost (GCRC) is the cost to replace an asset with a similar item in new, current modern equivalent condition having the same or similar functions, useful output or service potential. The GCRC forms the basis of determining the Insurance Value, a requirement of the South Australian Government’s re-insurance corporation SAICORP. The GCRC is calculated by SAMIS and is derived by applying a formula comprising the building area multiplied by an appropriate unit rate cost. Alternatively the system can calculate the GCRC by adding the total of the room areas comprising the building footprint multiplied by their unit rate costs. When estimating replacement cost the unit rate applied by SAMIS to calculate the GCRC takes into consideration a range of factors including building type and structure, fabric, associated engineering plant and services, fixed furniture and fittings. The GCRC includes fees and disbursements associated with design, documentation and project management. Unit rate costs are based on Adelaide metropolitan costs with an Index set at 100. The Index varies to reflect additional costs relating distance travelled from Adelaide. The GCRC excludes siteworks. See also: GCRC Calculation GCRC Override Reasons GCRC Unit Rates

124GCRC CalculationGCRC is calculated in accordance with Quantity Survey practice which uses the Gross Floor Area defined by the National Public Works Council as, “the sum of the Fully Enclosed Covered Area and Unenclosed Covered Area“. See also: Fully Enclosed Covered Area Unenclosed Covered Area

125GCRC Override ReasonsIn some cases, there may be a need to override the system generated GCRC Values for an asset for reasons such as Heritage Listings or by request of the User. An Override Reason must be chosen, to disable the automatic calculation of the Gross Current Replacement Costs. The user must then enter the GCRC manually. See also: GCRC GCRC Calculation GCRC Unit Rates

126GCRC Unit RatesGCRC Unit Rates are rates that have been pre-entered into SAMIS by System Administrators, to calculate any Gross Current Replacement Costs for assets. When a user calculates a GCRC, the GCRC Unit Rates are used to determine the GCRC. See also: GCRC GCRC Calculation GCRC Override Reasons

127General DetailsGeneral Details is a port]e[co page that allows you to add and edit the Asset Details of a new or existing Asset. See also: Asset Asset Details Asset View

128GeographicUsers of port]e[co have a choice of viewing many Sites in relation to each other (or a single Site) using an interactive Geographic Information System (GIS). Refer to: GIS

129GISGeographical Information System is a spatial searching functionality included in pel]o[rus, which is a product suite accessed through port]e[co. The user is able to pan and zoom on a map, locate and obtain information on sites and perform queries on sites and locations. Layers of supporting data can be added and subtracted to display information as required. GIS is a spatial data system which is linked to and supplied by the DPTI GIS Group.

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130Heritage Asset(1) An asset, including land, which is irreplaceable because of its unique historical, cultural or environmental attributes, and which is required to be reserved or maintained in perpetuity. (Source: NCRB) (2) An asset that has been placed on a special heritage asset register by an appropriate government agency (Federal, State or Local). (Source: UN)

131HierarchyWithin SAMIS, Hierarchy refers to how the Asset Register or Asset Classification System is structured in an ordered way, using parent / child relationships eg, within the Asset Register, site is a parent of Building and within the Classification Hierarchy, Floor Finishes is a sub-class of Finishes. See also: Performance Assessment Hierarchy Asset Class Hierarchy Ranking

132Historical CostThe cost at the time of asset acquisition is commonly referred to as its historical cost ie, the valuation of assets recognised for the first time. See also: Cost Cost Categories

133Holistic Integrated Management OptionsHolistic Integrated Intervention to address gaps in asset performance that should be considered holistically across a range of performance measures. There may be opportunities to integrate otherwise separate initiatives under a common strategy, where synergies can be achieved. For example, earthquake strengthening of a building may also be an opportunity to remove asbestos fire safety insulation and to achieve fire safety by alternative means. See also: Intervention Options

134HomeHome is the first page you will see when you log in to port]e[co. This page enables you to : Enter the Asset Register Search for an Asset or Facility Access Quick Links Personalise your visits with Preferences The Home Page link will initially take you to the same page as the port]e[co home page until you personalise your preferences and set another page as YOUR preferred Home Page. Then every time you log on to the system, you will automatically see your preferred Home Page. This can be any page you want and it can be changed as often as you like.

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135Image TypesImage Types are the kinds of files (e.g .jpg, .svg) which indicate whether they can be viewed in port]e[co. This information is held as metadata in systems that port]e[co has access to.

136Implementation TimeframeThe estimated time taken to implement an intervention action, package or an asset management plan.

137ImprovementImprovement is one of the Cost Categories within the port]e[co system. It refers to activities that improve the performance of the asset compared with its design level. See also : Cost Categories

138Improvements and AdditionsThose activities that may increase the value of the asset. (Source: SSA) (Improvements and additions may include such things as: carpets where no floor coverings previously existed; air conditioners where no plant previously existed; extensions to buildings increasing available floor area.)

139Indicative Costing - Capital & RecurrentThe approximate cost of an intervention action or package comprising capital cost (e.g. building work) and recurrent cost (ongoing costs such as operation and maintenance).

140Insurance (Reinstatement) ValueThe Insurance (Reinstatement) Value is a requirement of the South Australian Government’s re-insurance corporation SAICORP. It represents the current estimated cost of reinstating and / or replacing assets destroyed by any form of “insured peril” eg, fire, earthquake, flooding. The Insurance Value is calculated by SAMIS and is derived by applying a “reinsurance factor %” to the Gross Current Replacement Cost to take into consideration the cost of demolition and site clean up. The Insurance Value excludes siteworks. The Insurance Valuation includes fees and disbursements associated with project design, documentation and contract management costs. See also: GCRC

141Intervention Action ClassificationAn intervention action is required to remediate an asset's performance (as part of an asset Performance Plan) each action must be classified to allow further analysis later. See also: Intervention Package Intervention Option Intervention Classification

142Intervention ClassificationThe method of classifying Interventions exists within SAMIS. Code tables are pre set with a selection of classifications based on those articulated in Treasury Circular 311 Capital Investment Prioritisation which uses categories such as Investigation Acquisition, Replacement, Improvement, Sustainment and Disposal. These range across a spectrum from capital investing to operating expenditure. See also: Intervention Package Intervention Option Intervention Action Classification

143Intervention OptionIntervention options should be developed to bridge any performance gap(s) to varying degrees. The gap may be bridged completely, in which case there will be no residual risk, not at all (in which case there will be a lot of residual risk), or varying degrees in between. Options may encompass sustainment, replacement or disposal. The costs and benefits associated with various options can be assessed and compared. See Holistic Integrated Intervention

144Intervention PackageAn Intervention Package is a group of actions to bridge various performance gaps or deficiencies which, taken together, will be more cost effective than a series of individual actions.

145Intervention Package StatusMany Intervention Packages created over time for a Facility will be at different stages of progress. When maintaining Packages, the different status’ can be monitored and filtered for review. The Status’ are as follows - Raised, Deferred, Cancelled, Preferred, Approved, In Progress & Complete. As works are approved and begin to progress, these statuses are updated.

146InvestigationInvestigation is one of the Cost Categories within the port]e[co system. It refers to the activities necessary to prepare a feasibility or business case. See also : Cost Categories

147Item (Maintenance Item)An Item is a colloquial name for an Asset, Functional Group or Facility that can be combined with a measure, which is in turn assessed for its performance.

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148j - no glossary items exist

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149k - no glossary items exist

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150LANRefer to: Local Asset Name

151LCCRefer to: Lifecycle Costs

152LeaseAn agreement conveying the right from a lessor to a lessee to use an asset for a stated period of time in return for a series of payments by the lessee to the lessor. (Source: AAS)

153Legal Land ParcelsLegal Land Parcel references detail all land parcels that make up a site. The Land Services Group within DPTI manages these. If you have authorised security access within port]e[co, you can view the Land Parcels page which lists the Legal Land Parcel references and in some cases, multiple land parcels which may make up one site. The Legal Land Parcels page lists details from the land titles office, including Site Value, Capital Value, Site Area & Registered Owner. All details on this page are populated from external systems by Agency Administrators.

154LesseeUnder the terms of a lease arrangement, the lessee has the right to use an asset for a stated period of time in return for a series of payments to the lessor. In terms of SAMIS, the lessee is recorded as a Business Relationship. This is recorded when a different organisation or person is leasing a site that an agency has responsibility for.

155LessorUnder the terms of a lease arrangement, the lessor receives a return over a period of time in exchange for permitting use of an asset by a lessee. In terms of SAMIS, a Lessor is recorded when a government agency leases a site or building from an external organisation. In this case the Lessor is the person or organisation leasing the asset to the agency.

156Level of Access Depending on your role within the South Australian Government, your level of access to port]e[co will differ. Most users will only be able to see data from their own agency but there will be others who can see data from across agencies. Only very few users will have administration access and direct access to the Asset Register.

157lex]i[conlex]i[con provides help and training information on how the other three SAMIS products work ( port]e[co, pel]o[rus and cogn]I[to )and how they interact to provide a total suite of asset management functionality. This information is presented as a series of Help Pages, demonstrations or on-line tutorials.

158LGA - Local Government AreasThe Local Government Areas are enclosed by Borders or boundaries, which are especially relevant to the GIS (Geographic Information System) aspects of SAMIS. port]e[co records the LGA of every site, allowing for analysis of asset information by LGA.

159Lifecycle(1) The estimated period of time over which an asset is expected to be able to be used, or the benefits represented by the asset are expected to be derived. (Source: CA) (2) The complete life of an asset, from acquisition through to controlling, operating, maintaining and disposing of the asset. (Source: SSA)See also: See also: Lifecycle Costs Lifecycle Costing Actual Lifecycle Costs Forecast Lifecycle Costs

160Lifecycle Cost AnalysisA technique that enables a comparative cost assessment to be made for various investment alternatives, over a specified period of time, taking into account all relevant factors, both in terms of initial capital costs and future (estimated) costs. The object of LCC is to identify the most obvious economic overall choice. Initial costs include all investment costs directly related to a project, such as the costs of planning, design, construction and installation fees and charges, and financing costs, and future costs. Future costs mainly comprise operating, maintenance rehabilitation, demolition or removal costs, and property and capital gains taxes. (Source: NCRB) See also: Lifecycle Costing

161Lifecycle CostingThe total cost of owning the asset, considering costs of both a capital and recurring nature. Examples include design, construction, maintenance, insurance, refurbishment, operating and disposal costs. (Source : CA) See also: Lifecycle Lifecycle Costs Lifecycle Cost Analysis

162Lifecycle CostsThe total cost of an asset throughout its life, including the costs of planning, design, acquisition, operations, maintenance, and disposal, less any residual value (Source: NCRB) or the total cost of providing, owning, and maintaining a building or component over a predetermined evaluation period. The life cycle cost categories in SAMIS include, investigation, sustainment, improvement replacement, acquisition, disposal. See also: Lifecycle Lifecycle Costs Actual Lifecycle Costs Forecast Lifecycle Costs

163LikelihoodAn essential element in risk assessment is a determination of the probability or frequency of an event happening, or its Likelihood. When considered with the consequence of the event, enables the level of risk to be determined. Likelihood may be described in terms such as rare, unlikely, likely, almost certain. See also: Consequence Risk Rating

164Local Asset NameAll assets have a name assigned. The LAN - Local Asset Name is given to a room or functional area to assist in identifying or locating it. It is generally used by people local to a Facility or Site. Most assets converted from old systems when port]e[co went live, have names like Building C, Room 102 etc. port]e[co allows a user to also record a L.A.N which is what the asset is known as at the site. For example, Building C may be the Harry Jones Building, or Room 102 may be the Council Room.

165LocatableIf the Asset has a Class Category of 'unit', it is locatable. The only Asset Classes that can be located are those for which individual Assets can be created in their own right in the Asset Register. See also: Asset Location

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166Maintain RolesOne of the tasks of an Administrator is to maintain the Roles. This includes set up and maintenance of Role Codes, Descriptions and assigning modules of port]e[co that roles are able to access within the database. The varying roles define the scope of interaction and how end users can interact with the system functionality. Once these profiles and various levels of security access are defined, single or multiple users can be assigned to a particular role. Users are never assigned access to modules; they are assigned to roles that have been assigned access. See also: Maintain Users Users & Roles

167Maintain UsersMaintain Users is one of the tasks of an Administrator. This includes adding new users, setting up and maintaining passwords, contact details, address details and enabling / disabling the user’s ability to view plans and the level of detail for geographical searching. Maintain Users also allows the Administrator to assign a user to one or more roles. See also: Maintain Roles Users & Roles

168MaintenanceMaintenance describes all actions necessary for retaining an item or asset in, or restoring it to, its specified performance over its planned life. (Source: SSA) Maintenance does not include modification of an asset from its original condition; therefore activity to sustain a building at its designed level of service is not considered to be maintenance if it involves modification of the asset from its original condition (or design).

169Maintenance ItemRefer to: Item

170Major WorksRefer to: Capital Works

171MeasureRefer to: Performance Measure

172Metro Planning AreaThe particular Metropolitan Planning Area in which a Site is located must follow the development and planning guidelines for that area.

173Minor WorksA Construction project of a value of up to $150,000. (source: SATF) (Note: the costs must not be split between orders to fit within delegations and/or approvals.) See also: Capital Works

174Mobile AssetIn some cases, a mobile asset such as a Bus or Helicopter may be permanently located on a particular site and belong to a specific Facility. In other cases, Mobile Assets may be linked directly to a Business Entity because it is used and shared by a number of sites and can be located where ever it is needed. The Asset Register does not force you to link a Mobile Asset to a Facility; however most Mobile Assets will be linked to a Facility. See also: Asset

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175Nature of RiskThe nature or sources of risk may be categorised as economic, environmental, natural hazards, safety, property damage, security, and so on. When an agency user assigns a risk to a gap, the user has the opportunity to assign the nature of the risk. This is a textual description that can be used to provide further description that the risk poses for the business entity.

176Net Market ValueThe amount which could be expected to be received from the disposal of an asset in an orderly market after deducting costs expected to be incurred when realising the proceeds of the disposal. (Source: SATF) See also: Net Present Value

177Net Present ValueThe sum of the discounted benefits less discounted costs of a project. (Source: SATF) See also: Net Market Value

178New Work OptionsNew Work Options outline a range of practical and worthwhile changes that can be made to a Facility or Site to improve its performance against specified criteria.

179Non-Asset OptionA means of increasing service capacity or capability without creating or acquiring additional assets. (Source: DAIS)

180Non-Asset StrategiesMethods of addressing demand other than by adding asset capacity (ie no build solutions, pricing mechanisms, selective targeting of services etc.) (Source: DAIS)

181NorthingA Northing is the X coordinate for a Centroid See also: Centroid Easting

182NPVRefer to: Net Present Value

183NPWCThe National Public Works Council (Australia) is the precursor to the Australian Procurement and Construction Council, which has representation from all the State and Territory ‘public works authorities’ and deals with areas of common interest. The NPWC prepared an asset classification system and accompanying detailed definitions, which is the basis for the SAMIS Asset Classification Hierarchy.

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184OccupantThe occupant is a Business Relationship between a Business Entity and an Asset. This relationship is recorded for the information purposes when a third party organisation, usually non-government, occupies an asset. An example is a Florist in a hospital occupying the Florist Shop. See also: Business Relationships

185Operational RegionMost government departments separate their assets into operational regions. Each site within an agency falls into one of the operational regions. These Operational Regions are usually spatially defined and are also available via pel]o[rus.

186Options EvaluationA system of evaluating the options (including refurbishments and redevelopments) for bridging performance gaps to various degrees. Criteria for evaluating the options include life costs (capital and recurrent that can be reduced to Net Present Values for comparison), benefits in terms of risk reduction, acceptability of residual risk and available budget.

187Organisation Typesport]e[co records two types of business entities – public or private. These types are referred to as Organisation Types. Business Entity maintenance allows an administrator to set the Organisation Type for a Business Entity.

188Output Depreciation MethodRefer to: Depreciation Depreciation Methods Depreciation - Output method

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189PackageRefer to: Intervention Package

190Parent & Child AssetsShows the relation of one asset to another. A Parent Asset encompasses a collection of many individual Child Assets. A Parent Asset only exists because it is made up of a collection of minor Child assets. Eg. A Floor/Level (Parent) is made up of a group of Rooms (Child.) Further Parent - Child relationships occur as the focus becomes more defined. Eg. A Room (Parent) is made up of Walls (Child), Doors (Child), Window (Child) etc

191pel]o[rusGIS component to enable users to find and view assets geographically. Developed in partnership with DPTI GIS.

192Performance AssessmentPerformance Assessments are undertaken to record how a Facility, Site or Asset is performing at a point of time against a series of measures, and in relation to required or target levels of performance. Performance gaps or ‘hot spots’ can be identified, the risks associated with these gaps can be considered, and the deficiencies can be ranked and prioritised. See also: Actual Performance Assessment

193Performance MeasureThe criteria under which performance may be assessed. In SAMIS, the broad measures of capacity, suitability, condition and compliance are sufficiently generic for most agencies and form the basis of a performance assessment hierarchy, ranging from these broad (level 1) measures to more detailed measures (level 3). Targets are set against each of these measures and an overall performance can subsequently be derived. See also: Performance Measure Hierarchy

194Performance Measure Hierarchy Performance Measure Hierarchy provides a way of structuring a suite of performance measures that together, describe how the asset supports the organisation's business service delivery objectives. At the highest level in the hierarchy, three broad measures are identified i.e., capacity suitability and condition. These can be further articulate to a second level as follows: Capacity - Location Utilisation Suitability - Functionality Environment Condition - Physical Financial. See also: Performance Measures

195Performance StatusThe actual performance rating according to a single measure or group of measures.

196Performance TargetThe required level of performance on the rating scale for a particular performance measure. Note that the target does always have to be at the highest level.

197PlantEquipment and tools used in building operations. (Source: NCRB)

198port]e[coport]e[co contains the Asset Register and Performance Management functions and comprises around 2/3 of the total SAMIS system functions.

199Practical CompletionThe stage reached when a project has been essentially completed and is fit for its intended purpose, except for minor omissions and defects that do not prevent its use, and with tests required under the contract having been carried out. Practical completion is marked by the issue to the contractor of the ‘certificate of practical completion’ by the Superintendent. (Source: NCRB)

200Preferred Business EntityThe Preferred SAG South Australian Government Department under which you will usually search and view Assets. Your preferred Department's Logo will appear on every page.

201Present Day ValuesPresent Day Values is a tick box option found on the Lifecycle Cost Revenue Graph page in port]e[co. If ticked, the system will apply the Dept of Treasury & Finance discounting percentage to all future forecasts to represent them as present day values.

202Primary Business ServicesRefer to Business Services

203Projected Replacement ParametersProjected Replacement Parameters establish parameters used to calculate the projected replacement year of an asset. When an asset is added to port]e[co, the Projected Replacement Parameters are checked for the ‘expected’ life of the asset. If found, the Projected Replacement Year is set accordingly.

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204Quick LinksA collection of pages which you find useful and view regularly. If you find a page within port]e[co particularly useful or you are likely to use it regularly, you can add the page to your Quick Links. A permanent Quick Link which port]e[co produces for you is a link called “Last Search Results”. Once a Search has been completed, you can return to the same search results without specifying new criteria. This link is updated every time you perform a search, and will link you back to the last search performed.

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205RankTo arrange performance deficiencies in an ordered form i.e.from largest to smallest gap, highest to least risk, etc. Some pages within port]e[co allow you to order things by Rank. See also: Hierarchical Ranking Gap & Risk Analysis

206RankingRanking is a term associated with ordering priorities after conductind a performance assessment (where you have a range of competing deficiencies) or where you are prioritising remedial / intervention actions based on a number of criteria eg, risk, gap size, importance to business.

207Rating ScaleFor each performance measure, levels of performance with associated descriptive attributes need to be identified against which performance can be assessed. These descriptions are defined in a descending or scaled order from highest performance to lowest performance. An Agency Administrator will set the Rating Scale for the individual Agency.

208RatingsRefer to: Criticality Ratings

209Recurrent CostsAll costs, including the cost of finance, incurred in holding and operating an asset. (Source: DAIS) See also: Costs Capital

210Reducing Balance Depreciation MethodRefer to: Depreciation Depreciation Methods Depreciation - Reducing Balance Method

211Register HierarchyRefer to: Asset Register Hierarchy

212RehabilitationExtensive work intended to bring an asset up to a new standard or to alter it for a new use. (Refurbishment or upgrading) (Source: NCRB)

213RelationshipsRefer to: Business Relationships Facility Relationships

214Remaining Useful Life An estimated duration of time that remains within an asset’s life to viably perform its designed purpose.

215Renewal OptionsRenewal Options for an asset are determined based on a consideration of available budget, public need, demand for service, or the necessity to comply with legislation.

216RenovationA project of works for a building or facility that can include demolition and rebuilding of major structural elements to enable reuse for its current or previous purpose, or conversion to a new use. (Source: DAIS)

217RepairAny action required to restore or make good an item after failure or damage, by replacing it in full or in part using an identical item or components or an interchangeable item or components.

218Replacement The complete removal of an item and the use of another in its place. (Source: NCRB) Replacement is one of the Cost Categories within the port]e[co system. It refers to the activities necessary to maintain design performance by replacement of core components. See also: Cost Categories

219Request for ProposalA Request for Proposal (RFP) seeks information and opinions from prospective tenderers as to costs and methods of providing a specified service. It may be used to short list contenders in a multi-stage tendering process. (Source: CA)

220Reserved WordReserved Word is a term found within Oracle's database. If a user enters a word into the "Role Code" field on the port]e[co Maintain Roles page and this word has already been used within the database, they will see an error message. "A Reserved Word has been entered for the Business Role Code". An alternate word must be entered into the "Role Code" field.

221Residual RiskThe remaining level of risk [associated with a gap that remains] after risk treatment measures have been taken. (Source: SAA – AS4360)

222Residual ValueThe net amount expected to be recovered on disposal of a depreciable asset at the end of its useful life. (Source: SATF)

223Restoration(1) Comprehensive actions intended to bring an asset or item back to its original appearance or state. Restoration is not soley for functional or operational reasons, carried out as a part of the maintenance process but may also be required for historical preservation. (Source: NCRB) (2) Returning the existing fabric of the place (building, site, etc.) to known earlier state by removing accretions or by reassembling existing components without the introduction of new material. (Source: BC)

224Revenue CategoryWhere an asset has the capacity to generate Government revenue, different areas of monies generated are categorised to allow for analysis downstream.

225RFPRefer to: Request for Proposal

226Risk(1) The chance of something happening that will have an impact upon objectives. It is measured in terms of consequences and likelihood. (Source: SAA – AS4360) (2) The possibility that an outcome is not achieved or is replaced by another outcome or an unforseen event occurs. This includes both uncertainty due to future events and the consequences of limited knowledge, information or experience. The significance of risks is the impact that they may have on the achievement of proposal objectives, delivery goals or management objectives. (Source: DAIS)

227Risk CategoryRisk Categories are coded values that can be edited by the system administrator at any time. Within port]e[co’s Analysis of Asset Performance. Risks may be categorised as relating to business operations, health, safety, economic, natural events, political, environmental and the like. This helps to rank and prioritise risks associated with performance gaps. A Risk Category allows the asset planner to identify which business area the identified risk mostly affects. As in many cases where a high risk is identified, one that has a safety consequence will need to be addressed prior to one with a business consequence.

228Risk Evaluation ConsiderationsAfter various risks has been analysed in terms of likelihood and consequences and hence the level of risks determined, the risks associated with various performance gaps should be evaluated holistically and ranked or prioritised. During this process consideration should also be given to the impact or risks on service delivery and asset requirements.

229Risk Management(1) The systemic application of management policies, procedures and practices to the tasks of identifying, analysing, assessing, treating and monitoring risk. (Source: SAA: AS4360) (2) A structured way of identifying potential risks, analysing their consequences, and devising and implementing responses so as to ensure that proposal or project objectives are achieved. This includes management of ongoing risks associated with the ownership of assets. (Source: DAIS) (3) A management technique used to identify and analyse potential risks and to implement appropriate response. (Source: DAIS) There is a specific role within the construction process whereby the risks within a construction project are identified and managed. The term risk management is also used to refer to project risk management and the activities of the project manager in managing the identified risks.

230Risk RatingWhere a performance deficiency has been identified, Risk Rating refers to the likelihood of failure of that asset and the resulting consequence. Ratings are extreme, high, moderate and low (refer AS/NZS 4360, Appendix E) In SAMIS these can be also be categorised into the nature of the consequence i.e. Health, Business, etc. The AS/NZ standard 4360, risk matrix is held within SAMIS to help users determine levels of risk associated with performance gaps. See also: Likelihood Consequence

231RolesSecurity access within port]e[co is assigned via Roles. Roles such as Business Expert or Site Expert, are allocated security access to functionality. See also: Users & Roles

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232SAAStandards Australia Various definitions found in this Glossary refer to the definition’s Source: SAA

233SAGSouth Australian Government

234SAMISStrategic Asset Management Information System A system for collecting and analysing data on the performance of existing assets, including their operational costs. The Strategic Asset Management Information System is used within South Australia. See also: Asset Management Information System

235Scalable Vector GraphicsAn XML-based file format for two-dimensional vector graphics. Site & Building Plans available for the asset are saved as SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) files and can be viewed within the web page to review specific information relating to the site / building. The plan is interactive. Rolling the mouse over certain items on the plan allows information relating to that item to appear below the plan. For example, rolling over a building on a site plan will display the building name, local name and description and provide a link to go to the asset details for that building. Items that are "detectable" for rollover are buildings, sheds, rooms, fences, pools and paved areas. Technical Requirements Users must have the Adobe SVG Plug-in component installed on the client PC in order to interact with SVG files.

236School Enrolment DataAll data pertaining to student enrolment, numbers attending by year, sex and full time/part time, etc. This information is used to support ongoing development of schools, in accordance with usage trends and community needs.

237Search FieldA Search Field is an area provided in the interface for the entry of text, which will be the basis to perform a search. Search Fields require users to enter appropriate text / search words on which the system can base its data search. A complete search title or part of an asset’s name will give port]e[co something to search for.

238Service DeliveryRefer to: Business Service Delivery Strategy Service Delivery Context

239Service Delivery ContextService Delivery Context relates to an asset’s capacity to deliver services required by the community in which it is structured. The effectiveness of this service delivery is assessed against the measures of capacity, condition, suitability and compliance.

240Site(1)Any land on which development is being carried out or is proposed to be carried out, regardless of whether such land forms all or part of a single allotment, or a number of continuous allotments. (Source: NCRB) (2)Lands and other places to be made available and any other land and places made available to the contractor by the principal for the purpose of the contract. (Sources: SAA, DAIS)

241State BorderThe delineation between federated states and territories of Australia. These borders can be displayed in SAMIS's Geographic Information System - GIS, a spatial mapping service called pel]o[rus.

242Statistical DivisionsThe Australia Bureau of Statistics divides the state into Statistical Divisions for the purposes of collecting statistics for a census. Statistics collected reflect many diverse collections of information about the community, housing, education, income, assets and public demand and usage of services. These divisions can be displayed in port]e[co’s Geographic Information System- GIS, a spatial mapping service called pel]o[rus.

243Statistical Local AreasStatistical Local Areas refers to the local district areas defined by the Australian Bureau of Statistics that are used to collect data reflecting statistical knowledge and information about the population and how they use local services, etc.

244Straightline Depreciation MethodRefer to: Depreciation Depreciation Methods Depreciation - Straightline Method

245Strategic Asset Management - SAMSAM - Strategic Asset Management covers the development and implementation of plans and programs for asset creation, operation, maintenance, rehabilitation/ replacement, disposal, and performance monitoring to ensure that the desired service levels and other operational objectives are achieved at optimum cost. (Source: UN) It is the comprehensive management of asset demand, procurement, use, maintenance, operation, rehabilitation, disposal and replacement to maximise return on investment at the required standard of service. (Source: DAIS)

246Strategic Asset Management FrameworkThe Strategic Asset Management Framework describes how efficient and effective management of assets supports the delivery of government service outputs.

247Strategic Asset Management PlanA SAM Plan provides a framework for managing an asset, or group of assets, from within an agency’s asset portfolio. It sets out the strategies for management of demand, procurement, use, maintenance, operation, rehabilitation, disposal and replacement, which optimize the use of scarce resources in accordance with an agency’s required standard of service. A broad program of actions with associated timeframe and anticipated costs accompanies the plan.

248SustainmentSustainment is one of the Cost Categories within the port]e[co system. It refers to the activities necessary to ensure asset performance at the intended design level of performance. See also: Cost Categories

249SVGScalable Vector Graphics

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250TargetRefer to: Performance Target

251Text BoxA text box is a field where you may type an entry. It is a free text field.

252ThresholdThe Performance Threshold indicates a tolerance chosen by you, which is applied to the Target you have also chosen. It is the degree of variation that you are willing to accept, between Target hoped for and Actual Score given. The resulting gap between the target and actual scores should be an acceptable risk range. Example - If something is assessed with a Target set at 5 and a Threshold set at 3 and the Actual Score comes in as 4, this result is more than the Threshold but less than the Target so it is a risk, but because it did not score below the Threshold it would still be an acceptable risk. If the Actual score came it at 2, it is below the acceptable Threshold of 3 so it is a high risk which is unacceptable.

253Tolerance of RiskAn informed decision may be made to tolerate or accept some minor risks, rather than addressing them immediately, depending upon the likelihood and consequences of a particular risk. On the other hand, major or even minor risks may not be tolerated in some situations e.g. where life threatening.

254ToolboxThe Toolbox is an element that appears on every port]e[co page. This element can be hidden and expanded to help you see more of the page when required. The tools are a list of functionality hyperlinks, depending on the page you are looking at. For example Adding / Editing Assets & Facilities, Performance Assessments and Intervention processes. The Toolbox also has a constant list of hyperlinks for Search, Advanced Search, Help, Quick links & Preferences.

255TypesRefer to: Asset Types

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256Ultimate ResponsibilityUltimate Responsibility is a Facility Relationship between a site and a Business Entity. Ultimate Responsibility indicates which agency is eventually responsible for a site in the event of a disaster, for example. The Ultimate Responsibility relationship must be established before any Usage Relationships. See also: Usage Relationships

257UNCommon usage of a definition, but source undefined. Various definitions found in this Glossary refer to the definition’s Source: UN

258Unenclosed Covered AreaThe sum of all such areas at all building floor levels, including roofed balconies, open verandahs, porches and porticos, attached open covered ways alongside buildings, undercrofts and usable space under buildings, unenclosed access galleries (including ground floor) and any other trafficable covered areas of the building which are not totally enclosed by full height walls, computed by measuring the area between the enclosing walls or balustrade (i.e. from the inside face of the U.C.A. excluding the wall or balustrade thickness). When the covering element (i.e. roof or upper floor) is supported by columns, is cantilevered or is suspended, or any combination of these, the measurements shall be taken to the edge of the paving or to the edge of the cover, whichever is the lesser, U.C.A. shall not include eaves overhangs, sun shading, awnings and the like where these do not relate to clearly defined trafficable covered areas, nor shall it include connecting or isolated covered ways.

259UnitUnit is one of the Asset Class Categories within port]e[co. Refer to: Asset Class Category

260Unit RatesCost divided by the quantity of the appropriate Unit of Measurement. (Source: NPWC) Unit Rates define a set of parameters that determine a replacement cost for an asset. Unit rates determine an amount that is multiplied by (for example) the square metres of the asset to determine the replacement cost. Unit Rates can vary depending on such parameters as material (eg. timber vs. metal), finish (eg. colorbond vs. galvanised) or asset function (eg, carpet in a corridor vs. carpet in an office.)

261Usage RelationshipA Usage Relationship is established when an agency utilises assets that are the Ultimate Responsibility of a different agency. An example is a Dental Clinic on a school site. DHS will have a Usage Relationship for the building that is the Dental Clinic. See also: Ultimate Responsibility Business Relationships Facility Relationships

262Useful Life(1) The period over which an asset is expected to provide full service potential. (Source: DAIS) (2) The estimated period of time over which a depreciable asset is expected to be able to be used, or the benefits represented by the asset are expected to be derived. (Source: CA)

263UsersSecurity access within port]e[co is assigned to each user by virtue of their membership within certain “profiles” or Roles. Users are allocated to a role, usually for a given facility. See also: Users & Roles

264Users & RolesSecurity access within port]e[co is assigned to each user by virtue of their membership within certain “profiles” or Roles. Roles such as Business Expert or Site Expert are allocated security access based on their pre-determined functional requirements of the system. Users are allocated to a role, usually for a given facility. See also: Maintain Roles Maintain Users

V
265ValuationValuation refers to reliable measurement, free from material error or bias and that will provide a faithful representation of an asset’s future economic benefits. Relevant and consistent asset valuation techniques are necessary for financial accounting and reporting purposes. Guidance for the valuation of infrastructure assets is referred to in Treasury and Finance, ‘Accounting Policy Statement No 4’. In recognition of the potential for changing service delivery circumstances over the life of the asset, it may be necessary for agencies to review and adopt different valuation techniques during the asset’s life. SAMIS makes provision to accommodate a range of asset valuations. port]e[co can record up to seven different valuations for an asset. These include Gross Current Replacement Cost (GCRC), Fair value or Written Down Value. These Valuations give an indication of the value of an asset. See also: Value Analysis

266Value AnalysisA systematic analysis to identify the essential functions of systems, equipment, facilities and procedures that are consistent with purpose, performance, reliability and manageability. This analysis will facilitate the achievement of those functions in a way that represents the optimum value. (Source: DAIS) See also: Valuation

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267WDRCRefer to: Written Down Replacement Cost

268WeightingsRefer to: Criticality Weightings

269Whole of Life CostsThe total costs of asset ownership during its life ie, from ‘cradle to the grave’, including the Capital Costs (planning, construction, land and equipment) and the Operating Costs (staffing costs and the costs of maintenance refurbishment and disposal).

270WorksIn construction, the whole of the work described in the contract documents, including variations, which the contractor has contracted to provide. (Source: NCRB) See also: Works Categories Works Types

271Works CategoryWorks Categories describes different stages or objectives for works being carried out. SAMIS has many Works Category Codes that include Additional Investigation, Feasibility, Minor Work, Non Compliance, Programmed Maintenance, Replacement, Technical Services, Unplanned & Urgent Repair. See also: Works Works Types

272Written Down Reproduction CostThe Written Down Replacement Cost (WDRC) is the current depreciated value of the asset. It is calculated externally to port]e[co and manually entered. port]e[co records the method of depreciation used, but does not calculate it.

X
273x - no glossary items exist

Y
274y - no glossary items

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275Zoning CategoriesZoning Categories are spatial datasets used in port]e[co to indicate the land use zone permitted, such as residential, commercial or light industrial.